Queensview Professional Services

Services

Index




Assessment

Psychoeducational Assessment: This refers to the assessment of children, adolescents and adults experiencing difficulties in school or at work because of learning, attentional, or emotional problems.

The objective of the assessment is to gain insight into an individual's learning difficulties, understand the barriers to learning resulting from the difficulties and provide recommendations designed to minimize weaknesses and optimize strengths.

Psychoeducational assessments include:

  • preliminary and post-assessment interviews with clients
  • intellectual, memory, attentional, and educational testing
  • when necessary, the investigation of other psychological or emotional factors which may be impeding the client's ability to learn or function
  • a detailed report outlining current levels of cognitive functioning, aptitudes and academic achievement as well as recommendations for a remedial action plan
  • when requested, consultation with school staff to discuss the student's individual needs and to assist in selecting programs and appropriate educational strategies

Psychoeducational assessments are offered by Dr. Linda Spence, Dr. Jennifer Karp, Dr. Danielle Kingdon, Dr. Karima Lacène, Dr. Karyne Lavoie (French), Dr. Jacob Kaiserman, Dr. Jennifer Vriend, Dr. Jennifer Long, Dr. Molisa Meier and Emily Johnson (supervised by Dr. Jennifer Karp).



Assessment of Giftedness is offered by Dr. Karima Lacène, Dr. Linda Spence, Dr. Jennifer Karp, Dr. Jacob Kaiserman, Dr. Jennifer Vriend, Dr. Jennifer Long, Dr. Molisa Meier, Dr. Danielle Kingdon and Emily Johnson (supervised by Dr. Jennifer Karp).



Neuropsychological Assessment: This is an in-depth assessment of various aspects of brain functioning including attention,memory, language, visuo-spatial function and higher order thinking processes and behaviour. Neuropsychological assessments can be undertaken to assist in diagnosing conditions such as brain injury or Alzheimer's disease and other dementias or to evaluate strengths and weaknesses when the diagnosis is already known (for example after a stroke or in individuals with conditions such as multiple sclerosis).

Neuropsychological assessments typically include:

  • preliminary and post-assessment interviews with the client and family
  • testing of attention, memory, language, visuo-spatial, executive and other cognitive abilities
  • when necessary, the assessment of other psychological or emotional functioning
  • review of medical and other records
  • a detailed report outlining current levels of cognitive functioning, diagnosis or opinions as appropriate and recommendations for optimizing functioning or other interventions which may be helpful

Neuropsychological assessment for adults and seniors is provided by Dr. Barbara Collins, Dr. Laura Rees, Dr. Lisa Sweet, Dr. Clarissa Bush, Dr. Karyne Lavoie (French only).

Neuropsychological assessment for children and adolescents is provided by Dr. Clarissa Bush, Dr. Jennifer Long and Dr. Karyne Lavoie (French only).



Intervention



Psychotherapy: Psychotherapy encompasses a range of techniques based on communication and behavior change designed to improve mental health. Most forms of psychotherapy use spoken conversation. Clients and their therapist discuss issues in an effort to discover underlying problems and to find constructive solutions. Psychotherapy has been shown to be an effective treatment of mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, grief, chronic pain, and relationship problems, among many others. Moreover, psychotherapy has been shown to help people improve management and coping with acute and chronic health conditions, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Common types of psychotherapeutic treatments which have been shown to be effective by clinical research include cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, and systems therapy. Treatment can be offered on an individual, couple or family basis depending on the problem and whom it affects.

Often individuals will seek a therapist to consult about coping with problems associated with normal challenges in life, including dealing with problematic relationships, managing stress and meeting personal goals. Treatment of everyday problems, particularly in the absence of a mental health condition, is more often referred to as counseling.

Overall duration of treatment will vary depending on factors such as the nature of presenting issues and goals of intervention. Most often, clients and therapists meet weekly, but sessions may become more spread out toward the latter stages of treatment. Even after finishing treatment, it is not uncommon for clients to return for occasional "booster" sessions.

What to expect from the initial sessions (Adult): In terms of process, the practitioner will strive to understand the nature of presenting issues during the initial, assessment phase of treatment. The practitioner will typically ask for:

  • description of the problem (for example, when did the problem start, what makes it better or worse, how does the problem affect work or social life),
  • information about personal background (for example, details about experiences growing up, education and work history, marital status and interpersonal relationships) and
  • medical history (for example, review of any past or present medical conditions, the use of medication, alcohol or drugs).

If the client is working with a psychologist or psychological associate, psychological tests may also be used to better define the issues the client is experiencing. The practitioner will then review his/her overall clinical impressions with the client and together they will establish therapeutic goals and outline a treatment plan.

What to expect from the initial sessions (Child and Adolescent): During the initial assessment phase of treatment, the practitioner will typically meet with the child/adolescent and their parents. This format may differ for older adolescents, where the practitioner may ask to meet with the client alone for the first session. The practitioner will usually ask for information about the child's presenting problem as well as background information including developmental history, school history, social functioning and medical history. Parents are often asked to complete psychological rating scales evaluating the child's behavior and social-emotional functioning. Parents play an important role in the psychological assessment of their child, given their degree of knowledge about the child's behavior in different contexts and settings. The child/adolescent may also be asked to complete self-report scales evaluating their psychological well-being. After the initial assessment phase, the parents and child/adolescent are provided with feedback, including areas that may be helpful to address. A treatment plan is then established based on mutually agreed upon goals.

Psychotherapy for adults is offered by Dr. Clarissa Bush, Dr. Karima Lacène, Dr. Robin Hargadon, Dr. Lisa Sweet, Dr. Jacob Kaiserman, Dr. Molisa Meier, Dr. Angela Caron (supervised by Dr. Jacob Kaiserman), Dr. Jennifer Lyons (supervised by Dr. Jacob Kaiserman), and Dr. Danielle Bouchard (supervised by Dr. Jacob Kaiserman). Each of these professionals may treat different kinds of problems. Please refer to the "About Us" section of the web site to learn more about this.

Psychotherapy for children and adolescents is offered by Dr. Karima Lacène, Dr. Jennifer Karp, Dr. Danielle Kingdon, Dr. Jacob Kaiserman, Dr. Jennifer Vriend, Dr Jennifer Long, Dr. Molisa Meier, Emily Johnson (supervised by Dr. Jennifer Karp) and Dr. Jennifer Lyons (supervised by Dr. Jacob Kaiserman).



Couple Therapy: Couples often attend therapy when they experience conflict in their relationship or when they feel distant and isolated from each other. A couple's therapist will work towards reducing conflict, teaching communication skills, and developing a stronger bond between the couple. Couples may also visit a couple's therapist to help develop some of the tools to a healthy and strong relationship prior to getting married.

Overall duration of treatment will vary depending on factors such as the nature of presenting issues and goals of intervention. Most often, clients and therapists meet weekly. Even after finishing treatment, it is not uncommon for couples to return for occasional "booster" sessions.

What to expect from the initial sessions: In terms of process, the practitioner will strive to understand the nature of presenting issues during the initial, assessment phase of treatment. The assessment phase for couples often includes a session with the couple and a session with each member of the couple individually. The practitioner will typically ask for:

  • description of the problem and a relationship history
  • information about personal background (for example, details about experiences growing up, education and work history, and past relationships)

Couple Therapy is provided by Dr. Jacob Kaiserman and Dr. Angela Caron (supervised by Dr. Jacob Kaiserman).